Avoiding Danger Area in Cyclones and Hurricanes

Revised: Sunday, July 3, 2016

Lee's article on avoiding the worst of the weather from a tropical cyclone or hurricane is attached.

These systems have two important features: they move, and the wind circles around them like a wheel. Being away from the worst of it is good. With information about the system, you can position yourself either in an area where the movement of the system partly cancels the wind strength because they are opposite, or possibly avoid the main storm's effects.

Lee discusses how these storms are described by the weather service and how they describe the extent of the heavy stuff, and how to interpret or construct your "danger zone" for a given storm. Improved forecasting techniques have allowed this information to be sent out with greater precision.

The 1-2-3 rule is a technique for predicting the storm track, adding one degree of latitude per day out (1, 2, or 3) of the forecast. They tend to move north till they run out of energy.

File Attachment:
123Rule-min.pdf723.75 KB

After Graduating from the University of Wisconsin with a B.S. Degree in Meteorology, in January, 1972, thirty four and a half years later, I drew my last isobar lines on July 31, 2006, ending an amazing career of analyzing and forecasting weather for government and private industry. Now I have changed to a new career of passing on my knowledge and experience as an educator and trainer, part-time-full time, essentials of marine weather and advanced weather routing techniques to seafaring mariners.

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