Provisioning for Pacific Cup

Revised: Tuesday, November 27, 2012

Planning

How long will this race take you?

Before you can begin planning for how well you will eat on this trip you need to figure out how long it’s going to take.  Note the phrase “eating well.”  You are going to be occupied with three things on this voyage: sailing the boat well, sleeping and eating.  With a little navigating and i-pod zoning out as well.  So even the most basic of boats should pay some attention to making the process of fueling the crew efficient and enjoyable.

There is enough PCup finishing history now that you should be able to find a boat similar to yours and look at how long it took in an average year.  For starters a performance 36 to 40’ boat should finish in 11-12 days with normal conditions.  So obviously larger faster boats will be in the 7-10 day range and smaller or slower boats up to 14-16.  A slow year, i.e. no wind off the California coast, can add 2 or more days to the crossing.  Gear failures can and have added 5 or 6 days to the trip.  So figure out your optimal trip duration and add at least 50% in terms of meal planning.  Since you hope you don’t have to use those provisions they will have a different character.  Jim and Sue, in the original Pacific Cup Handbook, called it the “Culinary Incentive Program.”  Provide flavorful food and a variety of options for the optimal trip duration and Tang, dehydrated soup, and freeze dried meals for the contingency meals.  I recommended this at one P Cup seminar and a skipper called out: “That’s what we eat the entire race!”

Meals and menus

Just as your race strategy depends on the type of boat you are sailing and your goals, your menu planning does as well.  I’ve created three general categories: the BARE BONES (BB)—double-handers and fully crewed boats aiming at the podium who weigh their crew’s duffle bags, the CONTENTED CRUISERS (CC)—boats out to have fun but not equipped with all the modern conveniences, and the GOURMET GALLEY (GG)—boats equipped with microwave ovens, freezers, etc. who enjoy their food.  Some of the comments here apply to everyone and of course there are not hard and fast divisions but a continuum of approaches to provisioning for the race.

A few general tips from experience.  The first few days of the race are often wet and windy, with the boat banging around and a few crew members undoubtedly seasick.  So don’t start off with anything difficult or elaborate.  This is the time for everyone to consider individual meal servings: stew in a boil-in-bag for example.  Not everyone will want to eat; some will subsist on pilot crackers and fruit for a day or so.  Once the spinnaker is up and the boat is level, meal prep is easier and it’s more likely the crew will all be on deck for the dinner hour, so casseroles will work just fine.  As you approach Hawaii and the weather warms up you will probably not want to use the oven for any length of time, so consider stove top options.

First step in meal planning is to poll your crew.  Find out what they like to eat and can’t/won’t eat.  Will breakfast be cereal or eggs?  Who takes milk in their coffee? What are their favorite snacks?  Who can’t abide tuna fish sandwiches?  Unless you have some extreme food fussers it’s pretty easy to craft a menu that appeals to the entire crew.  If you are challenged by the menu planning, enlist a crew member or a spouse to help you out—it’s fun to assign tasks and bring someone more closely into the experience.

Sample menus and meal notes

Two sample menus are at the end of this article if you are looking for ideas.  In general most crews deal with breakfast and lunch on an individual basis since folks are on different watch schedules.  That said there should still be a predetermined meal plan for each day.  You are not looking for the crew to open a locker and contemplate choices.

Breakfast ideas: Aside from cereal and instant oatmeal there are bagels and cream cheese, muffins and coffee cakes (baked ahead and frozen for GG or eaten during the first few days for BB and CC).  With an oven of course you can bake from mixes or your own recipes broken down into dry and wet ingredients.  Eggs are great for CC and GG boats; stay tuned for a recipe section of the website.

Lunch: Soup, cup of noodles, sandwiches, quesadillas, tabouli salad, salami and mini cheeses.  Hot dogs taste great on boats, regardless of whether or not you eat them on shore, and hot dog buns keep for a frighteningly long time!

Dinner: For BB boats it’s off to the web or REI to survey the freeze dried choices.  If you haven’t tried a product, taste test one or more, at least the brand if not each dish. For CC boats a properly prepared icebox (see Stowing below) will allow you to utilize frozen home-made dishes using the stove top or gimbaled stove and GG boats can of course feature lasagna and other one dish meals warmed up in the oven, or roast a prime rib if they so desire.  On Surprise we always assigned one dinner entrée to each crew member, on the theory that they would have at least one meal they really liked.  It also cut down the work load of the chief cook and shopper.  Don’t forget vegetables and salad, for taste, texture and nutrition.  Many vegetables will do fine without refrigeration, at least for the first week, after that think cabbage, jicama, oranges, and apples.

Snacks: LOTS of them.  Clif bars or the like, trail mix, candy bars and a good supply of Tootsie pops if you are sailing a Schumacher designed boat.  Pudding or fruit cups, peanut butter crackers, popcorn for GG with a microwave—the list could be endless. Snacks should be readily accessible and not rationed.

Drinks: You are carrying water already, so don’t add to boat weight by taking cans of soda, fruit punch, beer etc.  If your crew can’t live without energy drinks you will have to make that call.  Best beverage is water.  Clean your tanks and add a charcoal filter if you think you need one. There are many powdered drink options: Cytomax, iced tea mix, lemonade, etc. that improve the taste of water (especially water maker water, which has no taste).  Don’t forget the individual hot chocolate envelopes for night watches.  For CC and GG fruit juice is nice for breakfast, frozen concentrate or refrigerated if you have the room or in individual boxes.  Caffeine is essential for lots of folks but some do without coffee or tea during the race. The most important aspect of liquids is to make sure everyone gets plenty.  Seasickness is dehydrating; if someone is queasy make sure they drink lots of water or ginger tea.  And as the weather warms up perspiration means more fluids are required, even if the body isn’t sending thirst signals.  A “bike” bottle for each crew member is a good idea—keeps water at hand and can be used to squirt water on the helmsperson’s face/eyes after they have been blasted by a wave or slimed by a squid.

Alcohol: Another personal choice.  Some boats forgo it completely; others may have a small glass of wine/beer with dinner or to celebrate at their halfway dinner.

Contingency meals: OK, we’re back to Tang, instant oatmeal, cereal bars, cup of noodles, pasta and freeze dried food or MREs.  Just remember that if you do have a problem that extends your trip significantly your remaining water supply will be diminished too unless you have a water maker.  If you use your emergency water supply you will not receive an official finish.  Consider the water required to prepare your emergency food—perhaps add a few bottles of water as well.

Shopping

Once your menu is more or less set you need to create your shopping lists.  It’s helpful to make three: items that can be purchased well ahead of time, items that can be purchased a few days before departure (tortillas, bread, hot dog buns, cheese, luncheon meat, eggs—anything with a use by date one or two weeks out) and finally items that are preferably purchased the date before departure—largely produce.  Go through your menu carefully and break down each dish into components and condiments.  Your tuna fish sandwiches will be mighty dry if you forget the mayonnaise.  

Make sure to include non-food items like wax paper, aluminum foil squares (good for wrapping burritos and sandwiches), paper towels, dish washing soap, garbage bags, toilet paper, wipes and so on.  Take as much as you think you will need but don’t take too much.  There is a sample shopping list in Sylvia’s provisioning article.

Then you need to establish food quantities based on crew size and serving size.  Don’t stint (unless you are a BB boat, where privation is part of the process).  Appetites will be large after the first couple days, hopefully the crew is working hard, and anyone on watch will be hungry.

Take a leisurely stroll through your favorite supermarket, including the aisles and sections you normally skip.  The range of prepared food available now is enormous and can simplify prep on the boat.  If mashed potatoes are on your menu consider a box—no it doesn’t taste as good but it beats peeling, boiling and mashing.  Minute rice in boil-in-bags simplifies prep and clean-up.  Pudding or fruit cups are an easy dessert or midnight snack.  If your crew doesn’t want to help by making a main dish ahead go visit Costco.  Many of their choices are surprisingly good.  This is particularly helpful for the return trip, when you likely won’t have access to a kitchen. You get the idea.

For freeze dried food and MREs visit the web, but do it well ahead of departure.  There are a number of sources but each time there is a disaster “emergency food” becomes scarce, or at least the choices are fewer.  Since the stuff keeps a long time there is no reason to delay purchasing these items, whether they are your primary menu or back-up.

A few tips from past racers: Shelf milk is better than powdered milk and in 8 oz. boxes the right quantity for adding to coffee.  Eggs that have never been refrigerated (generally from farmer’s markets) will keep longer (without refrigeration)—certainly long enough for this race.  Likewise produce from a local farmer’s market will be fresher than most anything from the supermarket.  In the Bay area there is one somewhere nearly every day.

Stowing

Where to put it—cold stuff

GG boats—If you have a freezer, great.  Now tee it up and put a few frozen things and a thermometer in it.  Check it after 24 hours. Chances are things are getting a little mushy and it’s warmer at the top than at the bottom.  So pay attention to the icebox blanket tip below.  Check your fridge as well and make sure it will hold temperature.  Pack it as full as you can on departure and remember LIFO (Last In First Out).  Net bags are useful for keeping produce corralled and make it easy to remove.  Likewise put lunch meat, cheese, hot dogs, etc. in baggies labeled with the menu day.  Many things we routinely refrigerate at home (mustard, jelly, etc.) really don’t need to be, at least for the one to two weeks race duration.

If your boat has a well insulated icebox it will function as a freezer for at least 5-6 days if packed solidly with frozen items and dry ice.  All the items going into it should be rectangular so there are no gaps.  You may want to add a layer of insulation on the inside of the box if yours is skimpy, definitely if one side is next to the oven.  Do a dry packing run with some aluminum casserole pans so you have some idea of meal capacity.  Figure a layer of dry ice (about 1”) for each layer of food.  Then make an insulated blanket for the top of the box.  This will help contain the cold as you remove items and the dry ice evaporates.  A ½” thick layer of Ensolite (camping sleeping pad) works.  If you want to optimize insulation sew the foam between two layers of space blanket material with flaps on all sides to accommodate the changing surface area of the box as volume declines.

When it comes to actually packing the box use as much dry ice as you can fit, using gloves and wrapping each piece in newspaper.  Fifty pounds is probably a minimum, 75-100 pounds better. The icebox on an Express 37 holds 7-8 days worth of frozen food and 100 pounds of dry ice, and keeps ice cream for 6 days. Preferably your frozen items have spent a few days in a commercial freezer so they are really cold.  Tape the lid so you have no gaps.  Dry ice is solid CO2.  It does not melt, but sublimates into carbon dioxide gas.  So taping the lid gaps not only stops cold air escaping, but restricts the gas leakage.

Boats using this method access the freezer once a day or less often.  Remove the food you need for the next day or two and put it in a small cooler to let it thaw.  You did organize the freezer LIFO didn’t you?  You can add your evening beer to the cooler to put a little chill on it.

If dry ice doesn’t meet your budget, or you object to using it, another alternative is to freeze plastic gallon jugs of water (leaving some space at the top for expansion).  This method won’t keep ice cream but has worked well at keeping things cool for a good portion of the trip. Some BB crews have reported using picnic coolers as mini-freezers for two/three days worth of meals. 

Prepping for the freezer

Pre-chill the freezer or ice box before the final loading—a freezer should have been running long enough to be good and cold, and an ice box should be packed with ice for a day or more before filling it with your ice bottles/dry ice and food.

Individual meal servings in “seal-a-meal” bags should be labeled with the menu day and contents.  If you don’t own a vacuum sealer and plan on buying one make sure it has a non-vacuum sealing option—otherwise you won’t be able to seal things like stew or chili. Some fully crewed BB boats divide their meals into two packages so that the off watch can eat just prior to going on watch and those coming off watch can follow up with their meal.

One dish meals for the oven can be prepared in a disposable aluminum pan, frozen, wrapped well with plastic wrap and/or foil.  Label with a piece of tape.  Likewise baked goods if you have room.  Ideally you should be loading your icebox/freezer with some really cold bricks.

Where to put it—other stuff

The key here is two fold—label and organize.  First remove as much packaging as you can, saves weight and trash.  Cut the baking instructions out of the muffin mix box and tape to the bag.  Most boats, especially BB, will put all meal components together and label them by meal and day, e.g. Day 1-Bk, Day 2-Din, Day 3-L etc. Many boats, whether  BB’s, CC’s or GG’s put all the daily needs, including paper towels, meal ingredients, snacks etc. into daily bags.  That assures you won’t run out of something.  On Trunk Monkey, a double-handed Express 27, Skip and Jody stored their freeze-dried meals in mesh bags, making it easy to pick out whatever they felt like eating.  On a larger fully crewed BB boat Jody consolidated the contents of 10 individual freeze dried meals into a vacuum sealed bag, reducing packaging and simplifying prep.

On both our Express 37 and Surprise we installed wood tracks on the underside of the deck (in a quarterberth) that would accept plastic bins, held in place with a snap shackle on a cord.  These were great for storing vegetables, as they got a lot of air circulation.  You might not want to go to that much trouble, though if you are outfitting your boat with an eye to long term cruising it is well worth it.  (See: the Outfitting Tips from Surprise)  Alternatively consider a place to use plastic bins temporarily.  They have two big advantages over hanging net bags: the contents don’t get banged around and no one will get seasick watching the bags sway back and forth.

On boats with a lot of built-in storage it’s helpful to annotate your menu with notes on meal prep and where to find the ingredients. 

It’s desirable to have assorted snacks in a readily accessible spot so midnight snacking doesn’t disturb the off-watch.  Space cases are good temporary storage for food items, but make sure they are well tied down, or stuff will be spread around the cabin sole in even moderate seas.

Cooking and Clean-up

Watch schedules and assignments

Your watch schedule will affect meal prep.  There are many watch systems and hence many meal scenarios.  One option with a rolling watch schedule on a CC or GG boat is to assign two people to the evening meal. One will be coming off watch about dinner time—this crew member does the evening meal prep and stays up long enough to eat.  The other person eats and does the clean-up, either just before their watch or in the first 30 minutes of their watch.  The evening meal is a social hour, with all the crew together.  The driver eats at the end of his/her shift on the wheel/tiller.  With a fixed watch schedule either one or two people get evening KP duty regularly or the off watch takes over.  The skipper just needs to decide how to parcel out the chores and let folks know definitively who is responsible.

As noted earlier with a crewed BB boat and fixed watch schedule the first shift will eat prior to their watch, and then put the meals for the next shift into the pot or oven so they can eat once they come off watch.  With double-handed BB boats it’s pretty obvious that chores will be evenly divvied up, but it still helps to have an understanding going in who will take care of what.

On CC and GG boats it’s useful to post the watch schedule, KP assignments, and other required chores.

Stoves and cooking vessels

Boats with built in galley stoves need to work on a method of securing them in the event of a roll-over.  Those boats without stoves may consider the hand held “Jet Boil” or the Forespar Mini Galley single burner gimbaled stove.  Forget the percolator and just use the large pot for boiling water.  On CC and GG boats a pressure cooker is a useful piece of equipment largely because the lid stays on regardless of how it bounces around the boat.  You don’t need the pressure for this sort of food prep, in fact mine long ago blew the valve.  But keeping a pot of scalding hot water contained is a good idea.

Another useful item is a hot pot or thermos.  Boiling water can be poured in while there is still light to see; it’s available later for hot chocolate, instant coffee or soup.  Make sure to figure out a way to keep the pot restrained.  A fire extinguisher clamp device or large hose clamp is one way.

Food prep

For BB boats food preparation will consist largely of pouring boiling water into foil packs.  Jody on Trunk Monkey found special bowls with lids that could be hung by their handles while the food was “cooking.”  Once done food was eaten directly out of the packaging, keeping clean-up to a minimum.  On the larger crewed BB boat a small cooler was used as a cooking vessel.  The consolidated packs of freeze dried entrees were put in the cooler, boiling water added, and the meal stayed warm even after it had “cooked” for thirty minutes.

For CC and GG boats with galley space meal prep can be more complex and leisurely.  Some folks recommend taking food out of seal-a-meal bags and putting in a pot to prevent bags from bursting in the pot of hot water.

Dishes/utensils

Forget plates and think large bowls with non-skid bottoms.  For over 20 years West Marine has been selling a 20 oz melamine bowl that works well.  Also a smaller bowl that works well for soup and cereal.  Sporks are good for BB boats; others can splurge on forks and soup spoons.  You might want to have a couple extras, as the crew on one race boat can testify.  The enthusiastic clean-up crew managed to throw all the eating utensils overboard with the dishwater.

Clean-up

On GG boats with large tanks or water-makers you can wash and rinse to your heart’s content in fresh water.  CC’s will likely wash in salt water and rinse in fresh (very important). BB’s will use every tip they learn to save on clean-up, both time and water.  It goes without saying you should be using biodegradable dish soap.  Food waste can go overboard; all packaging and “disposable” dishware goes to Hawaii with you.  Wipe/rinse as much food residue out before you put it in the trash. If you are lucky enough to do the return trip as well you will be appalled at the trash floating in the Pacific high.  Don’t make it worse.

Hawaii has curbside recycling but the last time I checked the Kaneohe Yacht Club was not set up to recycle PCup racer’s debris.  You shouldn’t have a lot of aluminum cans anyway.

Finally as you approach Hawaii get rid of any fresh fruit and vegetables remaining.  If no one wants to eat them then throw them overboard 25 miles out—you are doing a check-in then anyway, so add it to the list.  If it’s midnight and squally and you don’t remember, please don’t chuck them in Kaneohe Bay.  Just confess to the agriculture inspector and they will be confiscated.

One final note pertinent to the return trip:  As you load up the boat for that journey DO NOT bring any corrugated cardboard boxes on board.  Hawaii has lots of cockroaches and they love to lay eggs in between the layers of cardboard.  You don’t want extra company.

Pacific Cup 1998

SURPRISE

Meals

July 1 - Wednesday

Start is at 11:45, so please have a hearty breakfast, and we'll have an early dinner, once we're settled down.

DINNER:   SWEDISH MEATBALLS OVER RICE, JUDY'S BREADSTICK, PEAS&CARROTS, GINGERBREAD

July 2 - Thursday

BREAKFAST:               ORANGE JUICE, INSTANT OATMEAL, YOGURT, CRANBERRY/ORANGE MUFFINS

LUNCH:                        HOT DOGS, CHIPS, CHERRIES, COOKIES

DINNER:   CHICKEN/RICE CASSEROLE, YELLOW BEANS, PUDDING CUPS

July 3 - Friday

BREAKFAST:               GRAPEFRUIT JUICE, COFFEE CAKE, ORANGES

LUNCH:                        SOUP, TUNA SANDWICHES, CARROT/CELERY STICKS

DINNER:   SHEPHERD'S PIE, SLICED TOMATOES, BROWNIES

July 4 - Saturday

BREAKFAST:               ORANGE JUICE, EGG AND CHEESE BURRITOS W/ OR W/O SALSA

LUNCH:                        HAM AND CHEESE SANDWICHES, CHIPS, TOMATOES, COOKIES

DINNER:   CHICKEN DIJONNAISE, POTATO SALAD, CORN ON THE COB, PEACH CAKE

July 5 - Sunday

BREAKFAST:               TROPICAL JUICE , PANCAKES, SMOKY LINKS

LUNCH:                        SALAMI AND CHEESE, FRUIT LOAF, CRACKERS, PUDDING CUP

DINNER:   WILL'S MOM'S LASAGNA, GREEN SALAD, BREAD STICKS

July 6 - Monday

BREAKFAST:               ORANGE JUICE, ALMOND POPPYSEED MUFFINS

LUNCH:                        CHICKEN SALAD SANDWICH, CARROT/CELERY STICKS

DINNER:   SALMON, ROAST POTATOES, BROCCOLI, ICE CREAM

July 7 - Tuesday

BREAKFAST:               MELON SLICES, COFFEE CAKE, YOGURT

LUNCH:                        HOT DOGS, CHIPS

DINNER:   CARL'S CHICKEN ENCHILADAS, GUACOMOLE,GREEN SALAD, CAKE

July 8 - Wednesday

BREAKFAST:               ORANGE JUICE, EGG BURRITOS, FRUIT

LUNCH:                        QUESADILLAS, TORTILLA CHIPS, TOMATOES

DINNER:   VEAL AND ARTICHOKE STEW OVER RICE, ZUCCHINI AND CARROTS, PUDDING CUPS

July 9 - Thursday

BREAKFAST:               TROPICAL JUICE, FRENCH TOAST, SMOKIE LINKS

LUNCH:                        QUICHE, COLE SLAW

DINNER:   CHICKEN/SAUSAGE/RICE/VEGETABLE CASSEROLE + DESSERT

July 10 - Friday

BREAKFAST:               GUAVA JUICE, CEREAL, MILK, FRUIT

LUNCH:                        TURKEY AND CHEESE SANDWICHES

DINNER:   STUFFED BAKED POTATOES (CHILI, BROCCOLI, CHEESE, ETC), SALAD

July 11 - Saturday

BREAKFAST:               ORANGE JUICE, OATMEAL, MUFFINS, FRUIT

LUNCH:                        TUNA SANDWICH, FRUIT, COOKIES

DINNER:   PENNE PASTA W/SUNDRIED TOMATO SAUCE

July 12 to 21 (10 days)

Tang - 20 QT

Instant oatmeal = 20 regular, 20 apples&cinnamon, 20 cinnamon toast, 20 maple/brown sugar

Maruchan Noodles-shrimp = 18

Maruchan Ramen beef and chicken flavors = 36

Spice Hunter mashed potatoes = 24

Freeze-dried entrees:

Beef and Green Peppers (MH)=4

Chicken Polynesian (MH)=4

Hearty Stew w/Beef (MH)=4

Stroganoff Sauce&Beef w/noodles (MH)=2

Cheese Enchilada Ranchero=2

Pasta Salad=16+

Tuna Helper=10

Risotto=10

Chinese Rice=4

DRINKS:

Water

Crystal Lite = 36 QT

Coke (for Carl) = 12

Fruit Juice (for Will and Melinda) = 19 boxes and 4 cans

Ginger ale = 4

Beer (for Steve) = 4

Coffee

Tea

Hot chocolate

White wine = 3 bottles

Red wine = 3 bottles

SNACKS:  Anything in the recess behind the stove is fair game.  Apples, oranges, power bars (15), Clif bars-apricot = 12, Rice Krispie treats, candy, popcorn.

KP for dinner and the following morning breakfast will be carried out by the people who come on watch at 1700 and 1800.  They may split cooking/cleaning duties as they see fit.  Lunch will be ad hoc.

Pacific Cup 2004

SURPRISE

Menu and Meal Preparation

LOOK ON STORAGE LIST FOR LOCATION OF ITEMS

ALL FROZEN MEALS GET TAKEN OUT OF FREEZER IN THE MORNING!! PUT IN OVEN (OFF)

June 30 - Wednesday

DINNER:   CUP OF SOUPS-Add boiling water. SWEDISH MEATBALLS-Heat water in pressure cooker, Put one or more bags in for about 20 minutes.  Same with instant rice if desired, about 15 minutes.

July 1 – Thursday – Meal Day 1

BREAKFAST:               ORANGE JUICE-Use 64oz container in frig. OATMEAL-Add boiling water. W/CRAISINS

LUNCH:                        PB&J OR TURKEY SANDWICHES-Turkey, mayo and lettuce planned, FRUIT (APPLE or ORANGE)

DINNER:   SWEDISH MEATBALLS-See above  RICE-Ditto. PEAS-Make a small slit in bag and microwave for 5 minutes or so.  PUDDING CUPS

July 2 – Friday – Day 2

BREAKFAST:               GRAPEFRUIT JUICE-Use 64 oz container in frig.  Steve gets leftover OJ because he can’t drink grapefruit. BAGELS & CREAM CHEESE

LUNCH:                        SOUP-Add milk from frig. TUNA SANDWICHES-Tuna, mayo, pickle relish, lettuce. CARROT/CELERY-Need to chop celery into STICKS

DINNER:   BILL’S CHICKEN/RICE-Heat for 60 minutes + at 350, depending on state of defrost.  GREEN BEANS-Trim ends, add a about an inch of water to saucepan and steam for 5+ minutes. COOKIES-Raspberry Spritz

July 3 – Saturday – Day 3

BREAKFAST:               ORANGE JUICE-Use 32 oz container in frig+leftover. EGG AND CHEESE BURRITOS W/SALSA-Scramble a dozen eggs, warm tortillas in microwave (30 seconds). Assembly line eggs, shredded cheese and salsa (drain) onto tortillas, roll and wrap in a paper towel. 

LUNCH:                        HOT DOGS-Dogs can be boiled for a group.  For one at a time, put in bun, wrap in paper towel and microwave for 45 seconds.  Condiments are yellow mustard, relish and catsup.  PRINGLES-One can CHERRY TOMATOES

DINNER:   BOB’S SHRIMP JAMBALAYA-Heat for 60 minutes + at 350, depending on state of defrost. CORNBREAD-Hah, a challenge!  Mix and bake according to directions, using an egg. FRUIT CUP-Serve from cans.

Take chicken-apple sausages out of freezer and put in frig.

July 4 – Sunday – Day 4

BREAKFAST:               GUAVA JUICE-Use 64 oz container in frig. MACNUT PANCAKES-Mix pancakes w/eggs according to directions on can. Griddle is in cabinet under oven.  Use a very little corn oil.  Syrup. CHICKEN APPLE SAUSAGES-Don’t need to cook, just heat and brown in frypan.

LUNCH:                        CHICKEN SALAD SANDWICH-Canned chicken, pimentos, mayo, lettuce. CARROT/CELERY-Celery needs to be cut into STICKS

DINNER:   BBQ BRISKET-Unwrap from foil and plastic, add a little BBQ sauce to the pan, cover w/foil and heat at 350 for 30 minutes.  Take out while TATER TOTS heat at 450 for 18 minutes.  Slice thin.  TOMATO SALAD-Slice tomatoes, add a little basil and feta cheese+dressing. PEACH COBBLER-See if you can talk an afternoon off-watch person into making this before dinner.

July 5 – Monday – Day 5

BREAKFAST:               MELON SLICES, ALMOND POPPYSEED MUFFINS-Make muffins according to directions.

LUNCH:                        SALAMI AND CHEESE, OLIVES, CRACKERS, DRIED FRUIT

DINNER:   SALMON W/HOLLANDAISE-Sauté salmon in butter/oil combo, make hollandaise w/shelf milk according to envelope directions.  ROAST POTATOES-Heat in 450 oven for 20-25 minutes, BROCCOLI-Trim and steam or microwave for 8 minutes, ICE CREAM PIE-Take from freezer just before serving.

July 6 – Tuesday – Day 6

BREAKFAST:               ORANGE JUICE-Use 12oz concentrate from freezer, add water. EGG AND CHEESE BURRITOS W/SALSA-See above Day 3. FRUIT-Orange slices.

LUNCH:                        HOT DOGS-See Day 3. PRINGLES-One can.

DINNER:   JEFF’S CHICKEN ENCHILADAS-Heat covered in 350 over for 60 minutes +. GUACOMOLE, GREEN SALAD + Dressing. BROWNIES-Make in the afternoon.

July 7 – Wednesday –Day 7

BREAKFAST:               GRAPEFRUIT JUICE-Use 12oz concentrate from freezer. COFFEE CAKE-Make according to directions.

LUNCH:                        QUESADILLAS W/SALSA-Warm flour tortillas briefly in microwave to make flexible, add shredded cheese and green chilies + a little taco sauce to one half, fold over and heat until lightly browned in skillet.  No oil.  Serve w/salsa. TORTILLA CHIPS, CHERRY TOMATOES

DINNER:   SUTTER’S BEEF STROGANOFF-Heat at 350 oven for 60 minutes, etc.  ZUCCHINI AND CARROTS-Slice zucchini and carrots into julienne and microwave for about 7 minutes.  PUDDING CUPS

July 8 – Thursday – Day 8

BREAKFAST:               CRAN/APPLE JUICE-From jug. FRENCH TOAST-Beat eggs (about 8-save one for Day 10 muffins) w/ a little milk, soak bread briefly and sauté in butter. BACON STRIPS-Heat per instructions.

LUNCH:                        HAM AND CHEESE SANDWICHES-Ham, cheese, mayo, honey mustard, perhaps lettuce. PICKLES, PRINGLES

DINNER:   LISA’S CHICKEN SATE W/CURRIED RICE-Heat covered, as usual. CHUTNEY, ASIAN COLE SLAW-Shred cabbage, slice water chestnuts, mix peanut sauce w/little mayo to make dressing. FRUIT CUPS

July 9 – Friday – Day 9

BREAKFAST:               GUAVA JUICE-From jug. CEREAL, MILK, FRUIT

LUNCH:                        PASTA SALAD W/CHICKEN-Boil pasta, add dressing. COLE SLAW-Shred cabbage, add pineapple, thin mayo w/pineapple juice for dressing.

DINNER:   SUSAN’S SPINACH LASAGNA-Heat a usual.  TOMATO SALAD-Slice tomatoes, add feta cheese and a little dressing. BREAD STICKS, COOKIES-Bake per Jeff’s instructions.

July 10 – Saturday – Day 10

BREAKFAST:               CRANBERRY JUICE-From jug. OATMEAL, MUFFINS, APPLE or ORANGE

LUNCH:                        TUNA SANDWICH, FRUIT CUPS

DINNER:   PENNE PASTA W/SUNDRIED TOMATO SAUCE

DRINKS:   COFFEE, TEA, HOT CHOCOLATE, CRYSTAL LITE, CYTOMAX,  WINE/BEER/DIET COKE, WATER

SNACKS:  RICE CRISPIE TREATS, NESTLE CHOC CHIP COOKIE CANDY BARS, MINTS, TOOTSIE POPS,

                                        POPCORN, A FEW LUNA BARS FOR THOSE WHO WANT NUTRITION INSTEAD OF SUGAR RUSH

July 11 to 20 (8 days)  Most in box in aft compartment. Noodles in C-3

Tang - 11 QT

Instant oatmeal = 14 apples&cinnamon, 14 mixed, 14 maple/brown sugar

Cereal bars = 14

Maruchan Noodles-shrimp = 24

Soup + fry bread = 7

Cous-cous = 28

Freeze-dried entrees:

                    Beef stroganoff and green beans = 7

                    Beef stew = 7

                    Bandito egg scramble = 7

                    Chili + bacon = 7

                    Tortellini = 7

                    Pasta salad + chicken = 7

                    Pasta salad + tuna = 7

                    Brown rice jambalaya and sausage = 7

File Attachment:

Susan Chamberlin

Along with Steve, Susan has owned and sailed sailing canoes, a J-24, Express 37 and Surprise, a Schumacher designed custom 46’ sloop. 

MORE IN THIS CATEGORY

Food

Melinda and Bill Erkelens ,
, Jody McCormack
, Steve Chamberlin
, Susan Chamberlin
, Sylvia Seaberg

Getting Back

, Steve Chamberlin